Spider in the kitchen

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Another attempt to make a cobweb-like scarf. This time just from merino 21 micron, greyish with a pink, turquois and mustard fleck.

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Materials: cca 1,8 m of merino sliver plus felting tools. Result: scarf, size 150×33 cm, 50 g (2 oz)

How to: First I put bubble wrap bubble side down and merino on the top. For about 30 minutes I was spreading merino as much as I could & as the width of the bubble wrap allowed (just 50 cm). It felt a bit like playing with Rappunzel’s hair :). I tried to make sure there were no holes at this stage. I put cca 10 cm of the sliver accross the whole 1,8 m of merino + some metalic embroidery yarn which I later pulled out because it didn’t bond well.

Then I wet the fibres with a soapy water, put the tull over and another bubble wrap bubbles side up on the top of it and very gently rubbed the surface until the wool passed the pinch test. Then I rolled it, put two plastic bags on each end of the roll to prevent the water having all over the place and tie it all with old tights at both ends. Rolled for 5-7 minutes, unrolled and rolled from the other end for another 5-7 minutes. Up to this stage there were no holes, except several ones at the edges: when i was rolling the bundle some parts of the scarf moved from the bubble wrap and the felt was ripped by it’s sharp edge. Lesson No 1 learned!

Then I put it for 30 sec in to microwave until it was very hot and wack it against a hard surface. This I did for several times and I think I should have been much more genle. Lesson No 2 learned! At this stage holes appeared.

When I stretched the scarf and the fibres didn’t move I proclaimed the scarf finished. Rinsed it and soaked it in the water + vinigar for a while, squeezed water.

Now, I don’t know if this is allowed: I irond the scarf to make it dry quickly and stretch the fibres. It takes a little bit of a texture away but looks tidy.

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 Although it is soo thin and light I am amazed how warm it is. I would like to explore this technique more.

 

Sorry for all the language mistakes, I am tired and the stomach bug hasn’t left our house yet, but I wanted to share this with you…

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12 thoughts on “Spider in the kitchen

  1. That is really beautiful. I’ve never done felting probably because you don’t have wool (any kind) readily available in the market but all your experiments with felting has got me really interested.

  2. Thank you, Vero and Maya.
    Maya, I know what you mean, the first time I touched wool roving was two months ago – for exactly the same reason. In Slovakia there is no wool in craft shops, although I wonder where it disappears since there are sheeps on every hill.
    But here in UK there are many companies who sell it abroad, eg. Wingham Wool.

  3. I think it’s beautiful, and I almost always use the iron to finish my felt pieces and “crisp” them up, unless the desired effect is lumpy/bumpy or irregular.

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